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Painting a Vinyl Floor

20140822_235959This is another segment in my farmhouse refresh series. I am still in the bathroom, forever in the bathroom. Over the last week I debated painting the floor, or laying a river stone floor. I decided I would paint the floor and see how it held up. Even knowing the vinyl is a step away from dead and I have a contingency plan, it made me nervous. Everything I read said painting it can turn out great, or a disaster. I read four or five different sets of directions on doing this, as if you don’t paint it properly, you regret the project. I was painstakingly careful with each step. I understand the finish won’t last forever but until I can afford reflooring, I wanted it to look nice.

I got a late start to the weekend, as Friday evening was a celebration for Andy’s parents’ fiftieth wedding anniversary! I am so in awe of being able to put up with one person, day in and day out, for that long. Kudos to them. They are a beautiful couple, and the meal was a lovely family dinner at one of the nicer restaurants in their town. I had the lasagna – divine! Gracie went with us but Lucy had to work. I wore a boho dress Andy brought back from a cruise earlier in the year. You know, one of those long things with handcrafted lace at the neckline that makes you feel like a princess and is extremely comfortable all at  the same time? A table full of relatives, some who had traveled from out of state, everyone sharing and laughing. The word I’d use to describe the meal is exuberant.

We weren’t back late and Andy was asleep as soon as his butt hit the leather sofa, so I left and got an early start Saturday. I had already glued down the popped up tiles, and filled in chipped corners, with a marine sealant/epoxy.

20140823_065639If you decide to paint vinyl floors, I will pass on what I read were the important bits: sand it to scuff it and scrape any odd globs off of it, clean thoroughly (I used Trisodium Phosphate at household strength), let every step dry before starting the next, and make sure your sealant is clear. Take the time to tape your edges off carefully, and spend the extra money to get the better masking tape. Be sure every product is made for high traffic, and porch/patio or exterior use to ensure durability. That’s IF you decide to paint your vinyl tile floor.

I followed the directions on dry time but it still flaked off when walking on it after the allotted time. I touched it up and allowed it to cure for a few days before sealing. I used a high-traffic high-gloss clear polyurethane, three coats, with about 72 hours between coats, and then a full week before I put the floor into service. Maneuvering from the hallway to the tub, standing on sink and toilet was interesting but kept me off the floor – and limber! Until I added the sealer, I was not sure on the floor. The sealer, though expensive, really made the difference.

Cost for this project was $30 for high-traffic porch and patio paint, $10 for the cleaner and deglosser, and $40 for the clear gloss sealant (the primer was costed in a prior post).

20140823_132805The disposable gloves were an absolute necessity for the floor project. The TSP cleanser is not to be used on skin, so I wore the gloves when I was scrubbing. I used them also to wash and rinse the floor and hung them to dry, so they were ready to go with the deglosser and painting steps. And again I used the disposable coveralls. I think I may need to get a new package. A side note on those – in the heat of the summer, they were very warm. They are breathable, but it was definitely an extra layer of insulation.  Because of the gloves and overalls, I was able to go right from working, to the store, just by removing those.

I toyed with the idea of using the respirator when I sanded the floor, but as I didn’t use a power sander, it seemed like overkill. I gently scuffed and then scrubbed. There wasn’t much dust. I did, however, need it on the fumes from the polyurethane.

Next week I must tackle the lighting, which I have been putting off. I don’t like to do that alone, at least without anyone in the house to call 911 if I zap myself. I’ve wired an addition before, but it’s been decades.

~BS

September is the NSC Congress & Expo in San Diego, CA. The Safety+Health magazine placed in each registration bag features Confined Space.

In keeping with that theme, I will break from my farmhouse reboot series to bring you these important CSE products!

Construction Gear and Discount Safety Gear, sister sites, both offer products for confined space entry (CSE). Construction Gear’s DBI-Sala Basic Tripod Hoist package features a no-tools set-up assembly that supports up to 310lbs. The two piece construction offers an adjustable mast and fold-up lower base for easy handling and storage. The DBI-Sala UCL Confined Space Hoist System is designed for manhole and CSE/retrieval applications. It comes equipped with an adjustable offset mast, lightweight lower mast, and 3-piece lightweight base. Winch and SRLs are sold separately.

Discount Safety Gear carries this DBI-Sala Rescue Ladder designed to provide a means of assisted rescue. The optional anchorage plate is idea for CSE systems. l Also at Discount Safety Gear are hundreds of cost-effective signs to be used in conjunction with CSE applications.

 

Rag Rolling

20140810_093358Now that hockey season has started (if you have kids that seriously engage in the sport, you know it requires about 13 months and billions of dollars a year), I will have some weekends to myself as Andy travels or hosts for hockey showcases, championships, and tournaments. Lucy plays while Gracie values the dad-time. Sometimes I go, but sometimes I need to sit out to allow their full bonding time. This weekend, Andy had two hockey dad house guests for a weekend kickoff to camp. I was hoping to get the walls and floor done with my copious spare time. Ha!

20140715_201112I have heard two schools of thought on stripping wallpaper: those who think it’s a nightmare and those who think it’s relatively easy. My opinion is somewhere in the middle but I will tell you, my mind has been changed about stripping all the wallpaper in the house. I heard about a secret weapon called a paper tiger but I couldn’t find one, so I just peeled, squirted, peeled, wiped, rinse, repeat. Because this job alternated tasks and I am doing this alone, the tool belt from SafetyGirl was really quite essential for keeping my screwdriver (scoring) and cleaning rag right near where I was working.

As I was stripping, one of the wall sconces fell off the wall and nailed me in the forehead. Luckily the wires remained nutted and the bulb didn’t break. “I know Daddy built you, light fixture, but Daddy ain’t here. I have no trouble tossing you in the garbage.” Remember my fear that I would find something amiss under the wall sconces? I kind of did – when the paper was removed last time, that second layer was left on and the new paper applied over it. It was almost impossible to remove.

I have to give credit where it is due: my dad was the king of repurposing and making things work. My mom is the queen of doing things right. I have to assume my dad was the one who left the traces of paper there.

The stripping took about a week of after-work work. Saturday I wiped down the walls, patched the dings, sanded, and primed. I used the half mask respirator when I sanded. If you’ve done drywall work before you know the value in this. So nice not to have to remove dust from my hair, nose, eyes, skin – you name it!

20140816_145517coverallI was going to rag-roll a seafoam glaze coating over white walls but the glaze ended up turning the very pale paint a warm beige. I am ok with that. I experimented and used a wet rag and the additive method, rolling the rag by hand, then scrubbing when almost dry, to smooth the pattern a bit to look more organic. That job was beyond a mess and I was glad to have Discount Safety Gear’s disposable coveralls. I wore one for the entire wall painting job, and I probably could have broken that down into two, the thing was so covered. The disposable rugged blue gloves were also a necessity because I would still have sticky glaze darkening my hands as I write.

An out-of-town friend was to stay with me Saturday night after spending time with her mother, which forced me to cdisp work gloveslean up mid-project. Gail ended up canceling due to a death in the family but I was very glad I was forced to clean for her arrival anyway. Andy invited me over to meet his friends, since I’d be available. Oh, and can I pick up a bottle of tonic water on my way? Mrs. Ford likes vodka and tonics and she may come out. Really?!? Picking up groceries for another woman? He said, “I’ll pay you back.” “Oh, no you don’t!” I said. “I prefer the right to bring this up for years to come, rather than have the dollar.” I arrived, tonic in hand, hyperventilating with all that still had to be done. Lucy, Grace, and what seemed like seven or eight other girls (I think in actuality there were only three) ran to the street fair down the road while the adults visited for a bit.

20140817_190925Sunday morning, I looked at the bathroom with fresh eyes before church. The walls looked unfinished, so I used the same metallic textured paint to paint a border at the ceilings, then I filled it in with chunks of texture smeared on with a small scraper. I think I got the stripe a bit too wide but I like it anyway. Again with the gloves and coveralls. Since I was using found and extra paint and glaze, cost for this phase was only $2.50 for the patch.

Painting the floor still makes me nervous, because while the vinyl tile is a step away from gone, everything I read said painting it can turn out great, or a disaster, and I can’t afford to replace it. I am also toying with the idea of what is called a Chattahoochee floor, or river stone/pebble floor. I am reading conflicting reviews, however, on whether this is best done by epoxy, or mortar and grout. I think if I did this, I would overlay the existing vinyl tile with black landscaping plastic and work that surface. With the weight and stones hugging the toilet it would stay in place, but also be much easier to remove if I don’t like it. I will ponder the floor for another week.

I ended up being glad I stopped for Mrs. Ford’s tonic, even though Mrs. Ford herself didn’t show up. Andy made me the best gin and tonic I have ever tasted. Quality gin, fresh lime juice, lovely garnish. I could happily live in that man’s kitchen.

~BS

EdgeRemember I said I suspected Andy would steal my safety glasses? Remember I told you about his golf outing last weekend? Well, they went missing about that time…

When he got back, I told him he owed me some quotes in exchange for the glasses. He said that in the active environment, the glasses were perfect. They felt great. He wore them the whole time because it was sunny, and didn’t notice he had them on. He wears safety glasses for work every day and said they are the most comfortable he’s ever worn. In fact, they are more comfortable than any sunglasses he’s worn.

I asked about the ear pieces. He said they didn’t pinch. The nose? Perfect for his adorable hunky nose (I can say that because I am a hunky too).

He volunteered to steal them back and pose for golfing and if he does, I will update this blog with that photo. I suspect he just wants to golf and wear the glasses again.

That Darn Bank!

It was full dark with no moon that evening. I had piled a pretty impressive stack of branches and sticks beside our driveway. All of a sudden inside the house my cell phone rang.  This strange sounding male voice that also sounded very like my husband said, Help! Help me! I can’t get up!  In trying to pitch the yard trash over the guard rail along our drive, he also pitched himself (all 6’2”) over the guard rail and then rolled all the way down to land in a patch of bushes almost at the bottom.

bankWe live 70 feet above US 19 with access and egress directly onto 19 from our driveway.  Fifteen years ago we moved into a house with very good bones and lots of elbow grease needed. There was no landscaping except for a couple of trees on the edges.  That bank was truly ugly! Over those years intervening a LOT of work has gone into the interior and exterior of our first home we ever owned.

I have had my own encounters with that bank as well.  It is a very steep incline so weeding and planting is often very dicey to say the least! Thistles seem to prosper prolifically on that darn bank and they have to be sprayed and pulled.  It’s difficult to pull or spray with one hand holding on to a root.

cleatRecently I found a fabulous product that makes a huge difference: STABILicer Lite Ice Cleats from Discount Safety Gear. I can actually keep from sliding with these wonderful cleats.  They are meant for winter safety but work great for dust or mud safety on that darn bank!

~AH

I tried to knock out as much as I could on the bathroom while Andy was away on his annual golf weekend. I had high aspirations. It’s a tiny room; how hard can it be!? Ha!

Thursday evening I mapped out my plan. Ceiling first, then cabinetry. I assembled my supplies and equipment, and Andy called.
“Why are you whispering?” I asked.
“Because if the guys know I am calling you, they will be merciless. They think I’m in the shower. You know Tom and Brad are bragging you up.”
“Tell the guys that if I am all that, you gotta maintain it.” I don’t understand how men miss that logic. “How was your day?”
“Incredible. I am having the time of my life.” [tons of noise in the background] “The guys just came in and busted me talking to you. I gotta go.” {click}

disp work glovesSaturday morning while Andy was having a three-aspirin cup of coffee, my first priority was the ceiling. I found a can of usable ceiling paint in the basement, so my only cost was an $8 roller kit on sale at a local big box store. I have heard many people say, “I didn’t think it needed it, but after doing it, what a difference!” Not so much for me. The ceilings in the house are generally good. My advice: if it looks like it was painted in the last year or so, a good washing is sufficient.

coverallThe SafetyGirl pink toolbelt was really handy for the overhead work. I stood on a small step stool to reach the fixture and with the belt, my cleaning supplies as well as screw driver were all there. No need to get up and down off the stool to retrieve items. The belt fit over the disposable 3M coveralls, which again were a huge help. I didn’t ruin any clothes with white paint drops. While these are meant to be tossed at the end of each day, they were so durable that I was able to use them for the entire two-phase project.

20140810_093800I decided to refurbish the cabinetry with a restoration kit that was left over from my prior home. The vanity was a dark wood and the kit was espresso – not much difference that I didn’t need to be immaculate with the procedure. I cleaned it, deglossed it, and then applied two coats of the espresso bond coat. I added a horrible textured silver patina and while I like the look better than if I had not used the metallic product, I was not entirely pleased with the texture and spreadability. For the deglossing, I wore the disposable gloves because the liquid was supposed to be pretty caustic. The thing I like best about the gloves is that they are breathable, yet offer great grip with the coated palms.

I purchased new hardware for the vanity from Big Box, and was hugely disappointed. Apparently the ceiling painting was just one time waster over the weekend. Some of the drawer pulls required a silicone lubricant to remove, which was another half hour. Then the new brushed silver drawer pulls fit only some of the drawers because the sink base is so old. The two sets of different sized screws that came with, were either too long or too short. I tried to use the old-hardware screws, which were the mama bear size, but they also did not work because of the mechanics of the old pulls. After much frustration, I painted the old tarnished hardware with the metallic textured finish and reinstalled them. They look better than they did, but are definitely dated. Now I have another trip to Big Box to return the new hardware. I am deciding whether I should try again on different handles and ask if Big Box will give me additional screws in the proper size. Let me know what you think!

Again I wore the disposable coveralls, which was a good thing. The glaze was very sticky and the silver paint was dark. Any miscalculation would have ruined my clothes. The cost for this task was $3, for the metallic paint, thanks to the leftover cabinet kit and the return of the hardware.
While Andy was hitting golf balls and drinking Patron, I cleaned and put away best I could. Time to start stripping wallpaper.

Saturday evening I got a text: “Call me on the hotel number. Reception here is bad.” I called and again, a whispered hello.
“Were the guys merciless last night?” I wanted to know.
“Oh yeah. They think I’m talking to Lucy. I actually did call her first.”
“Tell me about your day?” [noise again]
“Yeah, dad, tell mom I miss her too,” he said in a loud voice.
“Seriously?!” [shuffling and phone changing hands]
Tom: “Who is this?” [me trying to sound like Dad and ending up laughing instead] “Dude, you gave her the ROOM phone number!?”
Andy: “I gotta go.” {click}

20140810_093358I removed the over-toilet cabinet and shelving so the wallpaper stripping would go easier. I also removed the large homemade sconce lighting to see what I’d be up against in the wiring of new fixtures. To my great relief, my dad just had small junction box holes and the wiring capped nicely. I expected the lights may be covering huge defects of some sort.

Sunday after church, while still in my dress, I started pulling wallpaper while I waited to hear from Andy. A relatively clean job. The vinyl layer came off pretty easily and I sprayed the paper layer to soften the glue. The bathroom was quickly littered with shreds of old paper.

True to form, I got a text that Andy would be home earlier than expected because he needed to pick up Lucy from work, for me to be at the house at 1:30. As it was 1 and I had a hamper in the tub and hadn’t eaten lunch yet, I told him that time frame would not work (go, me!). My first time with a counter offer on together time. He told me to do what I needed to do to have peace about the upcoming week, and stop by when I was ready. I had had enough of that bathroom and was there by 2. I stayed until supper time so he could finish his day with father-daughter time.

And you know, he brought the girls back new sunglasses, and me five little “his and hers” Patron XO sets.

XO

~BS

Ready, Set, Go!

Floor20140715_201112The single bathroom is a tiny space with peeling wallpaper and dark and outdated cabinetry. I have chosen to start here because it should be relatively easy to freshen this room quickly. Call it my warmup, if you will.

I propose to paint the flooring and cabinetry, remove some of the outdated accessories, and add new fixtures. All over the course of four weeks. Sounds pretty simple. I’ve done my homework on what is needed to paint the vinyl flooring but until I’ve removed the wall sconces, I’m not sure what I am going to be getting into electrical-wise. We’ll find out together!coverall

The products I am going to feature for this room are SafetyGirl’s tool belt, sold on our SafetyGirl, Construction Gear, and Discount Safety Gear websites; and disposable coveralls, sold on our Discount Safety Gear and Construction Gear websites. Some other stuff I will use on our site will be featured in later room blogs, but I will also be using a respirator, gloves, and safety glasses.

My goal for this room is to complete my transformation in about $200 and one month’s time. The look I am going for is a spa-type one. I understand with a smallish, oldish bathroom and only $200 I will not get the pebbled-floor walk-in oversized glass shower with multiple shower heads that I want. Maybe when I add a master bath…Use vanity

Use wallI have purchased latex porch and patio paint, and Bullseye 1-2-3 primer. I will need to sand the floor, clean it, maybe also buy a deglosser, and definitely find a clear top coat. The paint is the palest seafoam green latex and I think it was supposed to be acrylic-based so I am unsure how it will fare.  The cabinetry will be done using Rustoleum’s Cabinet Transformations in Espresso. None of these companies has compensated me, nor do I represent them. I would like brushed stainless hardware for the cabinets. The existing towel bar will need to be replaced with something more modern. I also want to strip and paint the walls. So far, I am up to about $150 in consumables. Paint brushes and rollers will round out my parts list. I can keep the existing shower curtain and liner, and tub if I give it a good scrub. I want to keep the room uncluttered so I will be removing the curtain from the frosted window. If I have budget at the end of this project I will replace either the medicine cabinet’s sconce lighting or the ceiling light/fan fixture.

To interject some heart into this post so it doesn’t sound so commercial, Andy went for his annual golf weekend with the boys since I last blogged. My heart is heavy; the night before he left we had to deal with some pretty big pain from a pretty important girl. Some days are simply filled with introspection.

~BS

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